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Alex Feerer, CEO

Welcome to the Bright Green Future!

 

Green Light Energy Solutions Corporation takes great pride in introducing our innovative Waste-to-Energy (WtE) technology, Waste Conversion Pyrolysis (WCP), and equipment to the international market.


In response to the global waste crisis, we offer an environmentally and economically sound solution that generates electrical energy, harvests process heat, reclaims industrial-grade water, and minimizes or even  eliminates the need for a landfill while processing  municipal solid waste (MSW). Our WCP technology and equipment are field-tested and scalable to meet any capacity requirements.


By creating successful partnerships with various stakeholders in the environmental industry, corporate sector, government agencies, and financial community, we  support our own fundamental principles of  shaping our green future: by facilitating business opportunities as a means of solving environmental problems, we create win-win outcomes, promote economic growth.


Thank you for your interest in Green Light Energy Solutions Corporation!

 

Alex Feerer,

President & Chairman of the Board

 

 

GLES Corp. shifts focus to the USA.

We are moving, consolidating, and expanding our research, design, manufacturing, and testing operations to the USA. Our focus will be on commercialization of Waste Conversion Pyrolysis (WCP) technology and equipment in the USA and expansion to the world markets. Sites for developing, testing and operating commercial WCP-based Waste-to-Energy conversion facilities in Vermont, Massachusetts, Illinois, North Carolina, Georgia and California have been identified.

 

In addition, talks have been held with our strategic commercial partners and suppliers: Siemens Energy Inc., BHS Sorters, Forsite Development Inc, Ewaenergy Investment Group, WEIMA America Inc., and others.This strategic move opens new commercial opportunities for waste management companies, developers, general contractors, engineering and manufacturing companies, private investors:
  • creating Joint Ventures with GLES Corp. dedicated to developing Waste-to-Energy facilities based on WCP technology;
  • funding Waste-to-Energy facilities construction projects based on our technology;
  • manufacturing parts and components for our high-temperature pyrolysis systems;
  • acquiring limited amounts of GLES Corp.s stock, available for accredited investors only in a private placement.
Please inquire about these opportunities at either of our world offices or by e-mail: invest@glescorp.com

 

Energy from Waste

BMW X5 BMW X5 www.x5world.ru
The technological break through that is our proprietary Waste Conversion Pyrolysis Technology will allow for future's treatment methods that will challenge current models for waste disposal and energy production.

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News

Europe faces crunch decision on climate policy



As European leaders meet to take a final decision on a new climate and energy policy up to 2030, there is intense interest worldwide to see if Europe opts to take a bold lead in tackling climate change.


It has not been easy. Negotiations on the new climate and energy policy involving all 28 European Union member states have been going on for months and, in some instances, for years.

The European Council meets today and tomorrow in Brussels with a heavy agenda including the ebola outbreak in West Africa.

The European Commissions 2030 policy framework on climate and energy that is up for discussion has two key elements:

  • A binding agreement to cut overall EU CO2 emissions by 40% over 1990 levels by 2030.
  • Achieving savings of at least 30% in energy efficiency across the EU, also by 2030.

The long-term goal is an ambitious one nothing short of the transformation of Europes energy system and its economy. The EU will be decarbonised: the plan is to cut EU greenhouse gas emissions by between 80% and 90% by 2050.


There are other ingredients in the package, which is designed to replace the existing policy, focused on 2020 targets. These include commitments to renewables and to the reform of the EUs ailing Emissions Trading System, moves towards a more integrated cross-border energy system, plus the phasing out of subsidies for Europes coal industry.


The devil, as always, is in the detail. Achieving agreement among EU member countries each with its own distinctive political set-up and economic ambitions is difficult, some would say impossible. Many compromises have had to be made.

Binding targets

Some countries still have reservations about the whole idea of setting binding emission reduction targets, saying this will increase energy costs and result in Europe losing its economic competitiveness particularly with the US, where the price of energy has dropped significantly due to the widespread take-up of shale oil and gas.


Poland is one of the countries that will be hard to convince. It is heavily dependent on coal for its energy, and is fighting against any move to phase out subsidies for the coal industry.

A group of countries, led by Germany, wants EU energy efficiency targets to be binding, while others, led by an increasingly Euro-sceptic UK government, say each country should be allowed to set its own energy efficiency goals and that there should be less interference by Brussels.


Meanwhile, scientists and economists say the new package even if it is approved is not nearly ambitious enough.


Professor Jim Skea, a vice-chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, says countries are doing only what is politically achievable, rather than what is necessary to transform the EUs energy sector.


I dont think many people have grasped just how huge this task is, Skea told BBC news. It is absolutely extraordinary and unprecedented. My guess is that 40% for 2030 is too little too lateif we are really serious about our long-term targets.

Some business interests remain firmly opposed to the EUs new energy regime, but many of Europes biggest corporations frustrated by frequent changes in policy and by political interference are backing a call for more robust action on climate change.

Risks and impacts

We remain increasingly concerned at the costs, risks and impacts associated with delayed action on climate change on our markets, supply chains, resources costs, and upon society as a whole, says an open letter to the European Council from the Climate Group and 56 other leading EU businesses and organisations.


With relations between the EU and Russia increasingly strained due to events in Ukraine and elsewhere, European countries are concerned about their energy security and dependence on gas imports from Russia.

A report by the ECOFYS consultancy and the Open Climate Network group says gas imports into Europe could be cut in half by ramping up investment in renewable energy and achieving greater energy efficiency. Emissions targets would also be met much sooner.

A separate report by Ernst & Young, the professional services company, says the EU is in danger of missing out on the financial benefits of developing renewable technologies.


Stable long-term targets and smart industrial policy, Ernst & Young says, can help Europe secure its slice of a cake that will be worth hundreds of billions of dollars by the turn of the century.


Source